Best of the Week
Most Popular
1. Next Financial Crisis Is Already Here! John Lewis 99% Profits CRASH - Retail Sector Collapse - Nadeem_Walayat
2.Why Is Apple Giving This Tiny Stock A $900 Million Opportunity? - James Burgess
3.Gold Price Trend Analysis - - Nadeem_Walayatt
4.The Beginning of the End of the Dollar - Richard_Mills
5.Stock Market Trend Forecast Update - - Nadeem_Walayat
6.Hindenburg Omen & Consumer Confidence: More Signs of Stock Market Trouble in 2019 - Troy_Bombardia
7.Precious Metals Sector: It’s 2013 All Over Again - P_Radomski_CFA
8.Central Banks Have Gone Rogue, Putting Us All at Risk - Ellen_Brown
9.Gold Stocks Forced Capitulation - Zeal_LLC
10.The Post Bubble Market Contraction Thesis Receives Validation - Plunger
Last 7 days
Israel’s 50-Year Time Bomb, Pushing Palestinians to the Edge - 19th Oct 18
Bitcoin Trend Analysis 2018 - 19th Oct 18
History's Worst Stock Market Crash and the Greatest Investing Lesson! - 19th Oct 18
More Signs of a Stocks Bull Market Top and Start of a Bear Market in 2019 - 19th Oct 18
Stock Market Detailed Map Of Expected Price Movement Before The Breakout - 18th Oct 18
Determining the Outlook for Gold Mining Stock - 18th Oct 18
Investor Alert: Is the Trump Agenda in Peril? - 18th Oct 18
Stock Market is Making a Sharp Rally After a Sharp Drop. What’s Next? - 18th Oct 18
Global Warming (Assuming You Believe In It) Does Not Affect Gold - 18th Oct 18
Best Waterproof Compact Camera Olympus Tough TG-5 Review - Unboxing - 18th Oct 18
Silver's Time Is Coming - 17th Oct 18
Stock Market Volatility Breeds Contempt - 17th Oct 18
Gold 7-Year Bear Market Phase Is Over - 17th Oct 18
Gold - A Golden Escape - 17th Oct 18
Tec Stocks Sector Set For A Rebound? - 16th Oct 18
Real Estate Transactions are Becoming Seamless with Blockchain-Powered Data Sets - 16th Oct 18
Important Elements of a Viral Landing Page - 16th Oct 18
Stephen Leeb Predicts 3-Digit Silver and 5 Digit Gold?! - 16th Oct 18
BREXIT, Italy’s Deficit, The EU Summit And Fomcs Minutes In Focus - 16th Oct 18
Is this the Start of a Bear Market for Stocks? - 16th Oct 18
Chinese Economic Prospects Amid US Trade Wars - 16th Oct 18
2019’s Hottest Commodity Is About To Explode - 15th Oct 18
Keep A Proper Perspective About Stock Market Recent Move - 15th Oct 18
Is the Stocks Bull Dead? - 15th Oct 18
Stock Market Bottoms are a Process - 15th Oct 18
Fed is Doing More Than Just Raising Rates - 14th Oct 18
Stock Markets Last Cheap Sector - Gold - 14th Oct 18
Next Points for Crude Oil Bears - 13th Oct 18
Stock Market Crash: Time to Buy Stocks? - 12th Oct 18
Sheffield Best Secondary School Clusters for 2018-19 Place Applications - 12th Oct 18
Trump’s Tariffs Echo US Trade Policy That Led to the Great Depression - 12th Oct 18
US Dollar Engulfing Bearish Pattern Warns Of Dollar Weakness - 12th Oct 18
Stock Market Storm Crash, Dow Plunges to Trend Forecast! - 12th Oct 18

Market Oracle FREE Newsletter

Trading Any Market

European Debt Crisis Spiraling Out of Control, Will Greece Be Europe’s Lehman Brothers?

Economics / Global Debt Crisis May 01, 2010 - 08:15 AM GMT

By: Justice_Litle

Economics

Best Financial Markets Analysis ArticleThe Greek debt crisis now threatens to spiral out of control - in spite of IMF rescue efforts - and the fate of the entire eurozone is at stake.

The Greek debt crisis is serious... deadly serious. Those who still think the situation will turn out okay - that it will "blow over" - are clinging to foolish hopes, just as they have done at great cost in the past.


And what do I mean by "deadly serious?" Put it this way. The world may soon face the credible threat of systemic collapse for the entire eurozone.

I'm not kidding here. It's important that you get you a mental handle on this.

"Investors are abandoning the euro at a rate not seen since the collapse of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.," Bloomberg reported this week, "as Europe's worsening fiscal crisis threatens to splinter the 16-nation currency union."

The Lehman Brothers reference is not overkill. When Lehman went under in September 2008, it led to a horrifying domino chain of events that completely seized up the markets. The global financial system had a massive heart attack.

Now we are facing the same prospect in Europe.

To Know Is to Fear

Those who aren't concerned over what's happening in Europe now simply aren't paying attention. Those who ARE paying attention are seriously frightened.

To give you a sense of what we're dealing with, I've compiled a series of quotes and commentary from observers in the know (bold emphasis mine).

In a few days time, there might not be a euro zone for us to discuss. - Nouriel Roubini, Roubini Global Economics  

It's like Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearns. It is not so much the fundamentals as it is the unwillingness of the market to fund you. - Phillip Lane, Professor of International Economics, Trinity University

I covered emerging market sovereign bonds for many years, but I've never seen anything like this: a country trading at levels where the bear case is terrifying, the bull case is very hard to articulate, and everybody is talking about a possible default even when the country has an investment-grade credit rating from two agencies and is only one notch below investment grade at the third. Maybe the only thing which really explains what's going on is that both yields and ratings are sticky. Which would imply that Greece has a long way to deteriorate from here. - financial blogger Felix Salmon

The situation is deteriorating rapidly, and it's not clear who's in a position to stop the Greeks from going into a default situation. That creates a spillover effect. - Dr. Edward Yardeni, Yardeni Research

The issue is rollover risk [referring to Spanish debt contagion]. Spain has to issue new debt plus roll over existing debt to the tune of 225 billion euros this year. Fourty-five percent of their debt is held by foreigners so they are dependent on the kindness of strangers. - Jonathan Tepper, Variant Perception

Spain's cash flows are extremely bad... Spain's living standards are reliant on not just the roll of old debt, but also on significant further external lending... - Ray Dalio, Bridgewater Associates (one of the world's largest hedge funds)

Everything you knew or thought you believed about the European economy - and the eurozone, which lies at its heart - was just ripped up by financial markets and thrown out of the proverbial window. ...This is not now about Greece... This is about the fundamental structure of the eurozone. - Simon Johnson, former IMF chief economist

The Authorities Are Useless

As the Greece crisis unfolds, we will hear more from various authorities on how the problem is "contained." But if 2008 taught us anything at all, we should know just how useless such assurances are.

Subprime was supposed to be "contained" too, according to the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve. Remember all those soothing words that amounted to "calm down, there's nothing to worry about here," just before the whole system nearly melted down?

It is the job of the authorities to manage risk for the entire system, and thus to jawbone investors into complacency whenever possible in order to keep a lid on panic. Unfortunately, this requires routinely telling people "everything is fine" when, in reality, all hell is threatening to break loose.

Can Europe Even Afford a Bailout?

As of now, it isn't even clear whether Europe can afford a full bailout. Total cost estimates swing wildly, from a low end roughly $160 billion (for Greece alone) to an eye-watering $500 billion... or even more.

The real issue is contagion - not just the cost of bailing out Greece, but that of other troubled countries waiting in the wings. Looming largest among them: Spain.

"We have seen this movie before," says U.S. Representative Mark Kirk, who sits on the House Appropriations Committee that oversees dispersion of IMF funds. Kirk had direct experience (via the World Bank) with the Mexican debt crisis in 1982.

"Spain is five times as big as Greece," Kirk adds. "That would mean a package of 500 billion."

And 500 billion isn't even the worst estimate. David Mackie, chief economist with JPMorgan London, envisions the need for a eurozone rescue package equating to 600 billion euros... or a whopping $794 billion at current exchange rates.

Other investment bank analysts more or less agree with Mackie. "To fix the region's fiscal crisis," Bloomberg reports, "the EU may need a plan larger than the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program deployed by the U.S..."

The IMF Solves Little

But what about the International Monetary Fund? Can't they fix the problem? Nope.

First of all, the IMF doesn't have enough money to stop the contagion. If Greece were an isolated problem, and one which could feasibly be solved by an IMF cash injection, the answer would be "maybe."

But Greece is not isolated. It is one "problem" of many. And no one really believes IMF money will help anything in the long run anyway.

IMF efforts to bail out Argentina turned out to be a disaster. Argentina tried to implement the IMF's tough "austerity measures" - harsh fiscal conditions attached to the receipt of rescue funds - but cracked under the strain.

Argentina wound up going into default in 2002. If they couldn't hack it, there is no way Greece can. There is no political will among Greek leaders to belt-tighten to the point of pushing the country into deep recession, or even depression, simply to pay off external debts.

What's more, even if Greece takes IMF money, that just means existing creditors will be pushed to the back of the line. The IMF would demand preferential treatment as a lender of last resort (in terms of getting paid back first).

That means an IMF rescue package could actually make Greek debt holders more nervous, not less. Standard & Poor's estimates that investors could lose as much as 200 billion euros, or $265 billion, in the event of a Greek debt default.

The Germans Are Furious

Furious Germans are another roadblock to crisis resolution.

According to a weekend survey from Bild, a popular German magazine, 86% of Germans are dead set against bailing Greece out with German funds. A survey from German television channel NTV further found a stunning 92% of Germans thought Greece should go bankrupt.

Not very charitable, those Germans. But can you blame them? They know that if Greece gets a handout, more will come... on a much bigger scale.

Under more normal circumstances, European politicians would simply try to run roughshod over the will of the German populace. But this time, things have been complicated by a looming election on May 9. German Chancellor Angela Merkel can't afford to offend her constituents too much, even as other countries (like France) scream at Germany for not whipping out the checkbook.

No Black Swan Here

There has been no real leadership throughout this whole saga. Over the past few months, the ECB (European Central Bank) has revealed itself to be impotent and weak. Jean-Claude Trichet, the head of the ECB (and a man once dubbed "Mr. Euro"), has distinguished himself in the midst of Europe's crisis about as well as George W. Bush did during the supbrime meltdown.

Meanwhile, the inability of Europe's leaders to truly address the problem - or even to see and recognize the full extent of the problem in the first place - is eerily similar to the prevailing mood before Lehman's collapse.

Some would call the threat of eurozone collapse a "black swan," to use Nassim Taleb's famous term for unexpected and highly improbable events. But such a characterization would be false.

That's because, in many ways, the eurozone debt situation is the opposite of a black swan.

Fiscal crisis was both highly predictable for the euro member countries - many anticipated it from the initial launch of the euro - and highly probable to boot. The euro, some would argue, was a doomed experiment from the outset.

For all the above sturm und drang, we haven't even touched on the scariest part of the situation yet - the fact that European banks could be more vulnerable now than U.S. banks at the height of the supbrime crisis. More on that next time.

Source: http://www.taipanpublishinggroup.com/taipan-daily-043010.html

By Justice Litle
http://www.taipanpublishinggroup.com/

Justice Litle is the Editorial Director of Taipan Publishing Group, Editor of Justice Litle’s Macro Trader and Managing Editor to the free investing and trading e-letter Taipan Daily. Justice began his career by pursuing a Ph.D. in literature and philosophy at Oxford University in England, and continued his education at Pulacki University in Olomouc, Czech Republic, and Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia.

Aside from his career in the financial industry, Justice enjoys playing chess and poker; he enjoys scuba diving, snowboarding, hiking and traveling. The Cliffs of Moher in Ireland and Fox Glacier in New Zealand are two of his favorite places in the world, especially for hiking. What he loves most about traveling is the scenery and the friendly locals.

Copyright © 2010, Taipan Publishing Group

Justice_Litle Archive

© 2005-2018 http://www.MarketOracle.co.uk - The Market Oracle is a FREE Daily Financial Markets Analysis & Forecasting online publication.


Post Comment

Only logged in users are allowed to post comments. Register/ Log in

6 Critical Money Making Rules