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Investment Portfolio Protection Strategy

Stock-Markets / Investing 2009 Oct 29, 2009 - 04:30 AM GMT

By: Steve_Selengut

Stock-Markets

Best Financial Markets Analysis ArticleA participant in the morning Working Capital Model (WCM) investment workshop observed: I've noticed that my account balances are returning to their (June 2007) levels. People are talking down the economy and the dollar. Is there any preemptive action I need to take?


An afternoon workshop attendee spoke of a similar predicament, but cautioned that (with new high market value levels approaching) a repeat of the June 2007 through early March 2009 correction must be avoided--- a portfolio protection plan is essential!

What are they missing?

These investors are taking pretty much for granted the fact that their investment portfolios had more than merely survived the most severe correction in financial market history. They had recouped all of their market value, and maintained their cash flow to boot. The market averages remain 40% below their 2007 highs.

Their preemptive portfolio protection plan was already in place --- and it worked amazingly well, as it certainly should for anyone who follows the general principles and disciplined strategies of the WCM.

But instead of patting themselves on the back for their proper preparation and positioning, here they were, lamenting the possibility of the next dip in securities' prices. Corrections, big and small, are a simple fact of investment life whose origination point, unfortunately, can only be identified using rear view mirrors.

Investors constantly focus on the event instead of the opportunity that the event represents. Being retrospective instead of hindsightful helps us learn from our experiences. The length, depth, and scope of the financial crisis correction were unknowns in mid-2007. The parameters of the current advance are just as much of a mystery--- today.

The WCM forces us to prepare for cyclical oscillations by requiring: (a) that we take reasonable profits quickly whenever they are available, (b) that we maintain our "cost-based" asset allocation formula using long-term (like retirement, Bunky) goals, and that we slowly move into new opportunities only after downturns that the "conventional wisdom" identifies as correction level--- i. e., twenty percent.

So, a better question, concern, or observation during a rally (Yes, Virginia, seven consecutive months to the upside is a rally.), given the extraordinary performance scenario that these investors acknowledge, would be: What can I do to take advantage of the market cycle even more effectively--- the next time?

The answer is as practically simple as it is emotionally difficult. You need to add to portfolios during precipitous or long term market downturns to take advantage of lower prices--- just as you would do in every other aspect of your life. You need first to establish new positions, and then to add to old ones that continue to live up to WCM quality standards.

You need to maintain your asset allocation by adding to income positions properly, and monitor cost based diversification levels closely. You need to apply cyclical patience and understanding to your thinking and hang on to the safety bar until the climb back up the hill makes you smile. Repeat the process. Repeat the process. Repeat the process.

The retrospective?

The WCM was nearly fifteen years old when the robust 1987 rally became the dreaded "Black Monday", (computer loop?) correction on October 19th. Sudden and sharp, that 50% or so correction proved the applicability of a methodology that had fared well in earlier minor downturns.

According to WCM guidelines, portfolio "smart cash" was building through August; new buying overtook profit taking early in September, and continued well into 1988.

Five and ten years later, there were less disastrous corrections, followed by clear sailing until 9/11. There was one major difference: the government didn't kill any companies or undo market safeguards that had been in place since the Great Depression.

Dot-Com Bubble! What dot-com bubble?

Working Capital Model buying rules prohibit the type of rampant speculation that became Wall Street vogue during that era. The WCM credo after the bursting was: "no NASDAQ, no Mutual Funds, no IPOs, no problem." Investment Grade Value Stocks (IGVSI stocks) regained their luster as the no-value-no-profits securities slip-slided away into the Hudson.

Embarrassed Wall Street investment firms used their influence to ban the "Brainwashing" book and sent the authorities in to stifle the free speech of WCM users--- just a rumor, really.

Here we are once again. For the sixth time in the thirty-five years since its development, Working Capital Model operating systems are proving themselves to be an outstanding market cycle management methodology.

And what was it that the workshop participants didn't realize they had--- a preemptive portfolio protection strategy for the entire market cycle. One that even a caveman can learn to use effectively.

By Steve Selengut
800-245-0494
http://www.sancoservices.com
http://www.investmentmanagemen tbooks.com
Professional Portfolio Management since 1979
Author of: "The Brainwashing of the American Investor: The Book that Wall Street Does Not Want YOU to Read", and "A Millionaire's Secret Investment Strategy"

Disclaimer : Anything presented here is simply the opinion of Steve Selengut and should not be construed as anything else. One of the fascinating things about investing is that there are so many differing approaches, theories, and strategies. We encourage you to do your homework.

Steve Selengut Archive

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