Most Popular
1. It’s a New Macro, the Gold Market Knows It, But Dead Men Walking Do Not (yet)- Gary_Tanashian
2.Stock Market Presidential Election Cycle Seasonal Trend Analysis - Nadeem_Walayat
3. Bitcoin S&P Pattern - Nadeem_Walayat
4.Nvidia Blow Off Top - Flying High like the Phoenix too Close to the Sun - Nadeem_Walayat
4.U.S. financial market’s “Weimar phase” impact to your fiat and digital assets - Raymond_Matison
5. How to Profit from the Global Warming ClImate Change Mega Death Trend - Part1 - Nadeem_Walayat
7.Bitcoin Gravy Train Trend Forecast 2024 - - Nadeem_Walayat
8.The Bond Trade and Interest Rates - Nadeem_Walayat
9.It’s Easy to Scream Stocks Bubble! - Stephen_McBride
10.Fed’s Next Intertest Rate Move might not align with popular consensus - Richard_Mills
Last 7 days
Bitcoin Bull Market Bubble MANIA Rug Pulls 2024! - 19th May 24
Important Economic And Geopolitical Questions And Their Answers! - 19th May 24
Pakistan UN Ambassador Grows Some Balls Accuses Israel of Being Like Nazi Germany - 19th May 24
Could We See $27,000 Gold? - 19th May 24
Gold Mining Stocks Fundamentals - 19th May 24
The Gold and Silver Ship Will Set Sail! - 19th May 24
Micro Strategy Bubble Mania - 10th May 24
Biden's Bureau of Labor Statistics is Cooking Jobs Reports - 10th May 24
Bitcoin Price Swings Analysis - 9th May 24
Could Chinese Gold Be the Straw That Breaks the Dollar's Back? - 9th May 24
The Federal Reserve Is Broke! - 9th May 24
The Elliott Wave Crash Course - 9th May 24
Psychologically Prepared for Bitcoin Bull Market Bubble MANIA Rug Pull Corrections 2024 - 8th May 24
Why You Should Pay Attention to This Time-Tested Stock Market Indicator Now - 8th May 24
Copper: The India Factor - 8th May 24
Gold 2008 and 2022 All Over Again? Stocks, USDX - 8th May 24
Holocaust Survivor States Israel is Like Nazi Germany, The Fourth Reich - 8th May 24
Fourth Reich Invades Rafah Concentration Camp To Kill Palestinian Children - 8th May 24
THE GLOBAL WARMING CLIMATE CHANGE MEGA-TREND IS THE INFLATION MEGA-TREND! - 3rd May 24
Banxe Reviews: Revolutionising Financial Transactions with Innovative Solutions - 3rd May 24
MRNA - The beginning of the end of cancer? - 3rd May 24
The Future of Gaming: What's Coming Next? - 3rd May 24
What is A Split Capital Investment Trust? - 3rd May 24

Market Oracle FREE Newsletter

How to Protect your Wealth by Investing in AI Tech Stocks

Global Financial Crisis Worst Since 1930's Depression

Stock-Markets / Credit Crisis 2008 Jul 20, 2008 - 05:49 AM GMT

By: William_R_Thomson

Stock-Markets

Best Financial Markets Analysis ArticleQ: Are we looking at a financial system "avalanche" rather than a technical bear market, in equities and bonds?

A: In no way can this be seen as a normal bear market. This is undoubtedly the worst financial crisis in the developed world since the 1930s. The only period remotely similar was the bear market of 1973-75, which was itself a part of the extended 1966-82 bear market in US shares. That bear market was driven in part by a 13 fold increase in oil prices from 1972 to 1980. This time we have had a 14 fold increase in oil prices from the $10 low of 1999. Last time we had massive inflation of 20 percent per annum. That has not yet arrived but may well be in the pipeline.


However, in my view, the situation is far worse this time since the US financial system is extraordinarily stretched and stressed. Last time we only had the minor bankruptcies of Franklin National Bank and Continental Bank to contend with. Then there were no derivatives. This time they amount to more than 10 times world GDP and a greater multiple of bank capital. Within that total the most toxic ones are those unlisted, opaque, over the counter variety amounting to over $50 trillion, again multiples of US bank capital.

The revolution in market finance that began with the deregulation of the 1980s may be about to eat its young, as we have seen with the putative bailouts of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; if nationalization goes ahead the US visible national debt increases by $5 billion and is effectively double. The US would no longer qualify to join the Euro!

The US budget deficit could be on the verge of exploding upwards. Including war costs it is already over 4 percent of GDP. The economic slowdown and President Obama's plans for healthcare, whist noble and justifiable, even after tax increases, could send the deficit north of $1 trillion or 7 percent of GDP by 2010.

Q: What do you think the total "wealth loss" might be as a result of recent crises (in terms of falls in market cap, sub-prime losses and other losses by banks and investment banks, derivatives market losses in general)? Does anyone really know - or is the whole thing too opaque to estimate?

When Chou En-Lai was asked by Kissinger if he thought the French Revolution had been a success he responded β€˜it's too soon to tell'. That applies to the current situation. But we could be looking at $6 trillion in mark downs of housing wealth, $3-4 trillion in stock market losses if we get a 25-35 percent mark down in the market – and it could be worse – and then we have the losses of the banking system. So we are talking about possibly $10 trillion as compared with a GDP of $13 trillion. Proportionally, I would look for the UK to suffer similarly. It's not chicken feed!

Q: Do you think that inflation or deflation is the greatest threat facing the global e conomy - i.e. commodity price inflation versus the collapse in asset values (real estate and stocks etc).

This is the great debate. The losses are deflationary but the monetary and fiscal policies are hugely inflationary. So far the secondary effects of wage inflation are the dogs that have not barked yet, but the unions are clearly getting restive in Europe and the pressures are so intense on US wage earners that it surely must just be a matter of time before they try and restore some of their lost incomes.

Ultimately, governments never repay their debts in real terms. I look for the US to try and inflate its way out of its mess whilst, all the time, denying it is happening and quoting the manipulated inflation data. But one only needs to look at the private estimates of M3 growth to see that it has been growing at 18 percent per annum, double what it was when they stopped publishing the information and double the worst time in the stagflationary 1970s.

Q: How safe is US government debt as an investment now, given the stress of financing financial system bail-outs?

You will be repaid in US dollars with less purchasing power than when you subscribed. Whilst this crisis continues and the management of the White House and the Fed remain unchanged, the US dollar is a poor bet and a worse investment.

Q: What is the safest thing to "hold onto" in this avalanche - gold, other commodities, cash etc?

Gold, in my opinion, is the asset of last resort. It is no one else's liability and has shown its value in crises over the millennia. That situation remains unchanged. It is still cheap relative to oil on a historical basis and is only 40 percent of its all time high on an inflation adjusted basis. New supplies coming onto the markets are constrained by high costs and a lack of mining skills after a generation when no new graduates entered the sector.

Given the global geopolitical tensions added to the banking crisis, gold remains a superb insurance policy. Before the present cycle exhausts itself I would not be surprised to see gold reach all time highs on an inflation adjusted basis i.e., $2500.

Silver is also interesting here since it is a minor precious metal with expanding industrial applications. On an inflation adjusted basis it is even cheaper than gold.

There are an ever expanding range of instruments to tap the commodity space with ETFs and ETNs - long and short. There are also natural resource funds of hedge funds.

Q: Amongst equities and bonds, what (if anything) is there to go for now? Emerging markets versus advanced markets?

I believe we are entering a new phase in the global economy, one with increased government regulation, controls and spending. The old Thatcher-Reagan supply side revolution is likely to take a breather and a return to a modified Keynesian is a possibility. This is driven by the increased scepticism in developed economies about globalization, largely because the rewards have not been adequately distributed. This accords with the likelihood that the 36 year cycle in US Presidential elections will probably make the Democrats the leading party of government in the coming years with all that means for interference in the economy – and inflation.

The extent to which the growing scepticism of globalization in developed economies affects the future growth of emerging markets cannot be determined at this time. At the margins growth may be reduced slightly but the fundamental factors changing the shape of the global economy are too strong to be derailed. Emerging markets remain a field of great opportunity, especially after recent declines in countries like China, India and Vietnam. Others with essential commodities are exciting. Powered by Chinese and Indian investment, Africa could have a renaissance. Those with financial imbalances like those in Eastern Europe should be avoided.

By William R. Thomson
Chairman
Private Capital Ltd.
Hong Kong 
wrthomson@btconnect.com

Disclaimer: The above is a matter of opinion provided for general information purposes only and is not intended as investment advice. Information and analysis above are derived from sources and utilising methods believed to be reliable, but we cannot accept responsibility for any trading losses you may incur as a result of this analysis. Individuals should consult with their personal financial advisors before engaging in any trading activities.

William R. Thomson Archive

© 2005-2022 http://www.MarketOracle.co.uk - The Market Oracle is a FREE Daily Financial Markets Analysis & Forecasting online publication.


Comments

Allen Wood
20 Jul 08, 13:54
Just where is this financial crisis?

I live in Reisterstown Maryland, and this is not Rodeo Drive, and I see no signs of economic collapse. Just where is this depression anyway. IT is and has been business as usual in my area, and we are not millionaires here. I'm tired of hearing un-justified gloom and doom when the sky is absolutely not falling.

What gives, and why always about the collapse of the U.S. economy?


Dave
20 Jul 08, 17:40
See the Crash

For those that can not see the crash, it is because you are listening to cia news and don't get the facts.

you are living on borrowed money and don't feel the pinch

in essence you live in a bubble.

inflation arrives soon and will be a tidal wave that will sink many.


Rick Cowlishaw
01 Aug 08, 16:45
oil peak
There are several assumptions to the future predictions
Peak Oil is real and imminent; worldwide oil production is unlikely to ever exceed 85 million barrels per day and we are on the front edge of the top peak of oil production. Once at Peak, oil production will be at a plateau for some period (about 4 to 6 years), during which the possibility for further production increases will be argued but do not happen. Once the decline in oil production starts, it will drop by about 3 percent a year.

There is no viable alternative to oil, at least in the short term, and will take a minimum of 15 years to develop an alternative and produce vehicles that use this alternative.

That the decline in oil production will have serious negative economic consequences to all countries, especially those that are most dependent on oil.

The US oil companies cannot get additional oil from new wells on line until 2018 (10 years) at the earliest, and the amount would not be enough to either change the then current market price much or provide enough oil to make much of a difference. This is based on reports from Energy Information Agency EIA for both the Artic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and National Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Therefore we staring a deep depression in the face.

Post Comment

Only logged in users are allowed to post comments. Register/ Log in