Best of the Week
Most Popular
1. Five Charts That Show We Are on the Brink of an Unthinkable Financial Crisis- John_Mauldin
2.Bitcoin Parabolic Mania - Zeal_LLC
3.Bitcoin Doesn’t Exist – 2 - Raul_I_Meijer
4.Best Time / Month of Year to BUY a USED Car is DECEMBER, UK Analysis - Nadeem_Walayat
5.Labour Sheffield City Council Election Panic Could Prompt Suspension of Tree Felling's Private Security - N_Walayat
6.War on Gold Intensifies: It Betrays the Elitists’ Panic and Augurs Their Coming Defeat Part2 - Stewart_Dougherty
7.How High Will Gold Go? - Harry_Dent
8.Bitcoin Doesn’t Exist – Forks and Mad Max - Raul_I_Meijer
9.UK Stagflation Risk As Inflation Hits 3.1% and House Prices Fall - GoldCore
10.New EU Rules For Cross-Border Cash, Gold Bullion Movements - GoldCore
Last 7 days
Jim Rickards: Next Financial Panic Will Be the Biggest of All, with Only One Place to Turn… - 20th Jan 18
Macro Trend Changes for Gold in 2018 and Beyond - Empire Club of Canada - 20th Jan 18
Top 5 Trader Information Sources for Timely, Successful Investing - 20th Jan 18
Bond Market Bear Creating Gold Bull Market - 19th Jan 18
Gold Stocks GDX $25 Breakout on Earnings - 19th Jan 18
SPX is Higher But No Breakout - 19th Jan 18
Game Changer for Bitcoin - 19th Jan 18
Upside Risk for Gold in 2018 - 19th Jan 18
Money Minute - A 60-second snapshot of the UK Economy - 19th Jan 18
Discovery Sport Real MPG Fuel Economy Vs Land Rover 53.3 MPG Sales Pitch - 19th Jan 18
For Americans Buying Gold and Silver: Still a Big U.S. Pricing Advantage - 19th Jan 18
5 Maps And Charts That Predict Geopolitical Trends In 2018 - 19th Jan 18
North Korean Quagmire: Part 2. Bombing, Nuclear Threats, and Resolution - 19th Jan 18
Complete Guide On Forex Trading Market - 19th Jan 18
Bitcoin Crash Sees Flight To Physical Gold Coins and Bars - 18th Jan 18
The Interest Rates Are What Matter In This Market - 18th Jan 18
Crude Oil Sweat, Blood and Tears - 18th Jan 18
Land Rover Discovery Sport - Week 3 HSE Black Test Review - 18th Jan 18
The North Korea Quagmire: Part 1, A Contest of Colonialism and Communism - 18th Jan 18
Understand Currency Trade and Make Plenty of Money - 18th Jan 18
Bitcoin Price Crash Below $10,000. What's Next? We have answers… - 18th Jan 18
How to Trade Gold During Second Half of January, Daily Cycle Prediction - 18th Jan 18
More U.S. States Are Knocking Down Gold & Silver Barriers - 18th Jan 18
5 Economic Predictions for 2018 - 18th Jan 18
Land Rover Discovery Sport - What You Need to Know Before Buying - Owning Week 2 - 17th Jan 18
Bitcoin and Stock Prices, Both Symptoms of Speculative Extremes! - 17th Jan 18
So That’s What Stock Market Volatility Looks Like - 17th Jan 18
Tips On Choosing the Right Forex Dealer - 17th Jan 18
Crude Oil is Starting 2018 Strong but there's Undeniable Risk to the Downside - 16th Jan 18
SPX, NDX, INDU and RUT Stock Indices all at Resistance Levels - 16th Jan 18
Silver Prices To Surge – JP Morgan Has Acquired A “Massive Quantity of Physical Silver” - 16th Jan 18
Carillion Bankruptcy and the PFI Sector Spiraling Costs Crisis, Amey, G4S, Balfour Beatty, Serco.... - 16th Jan 18
Artificial Intelligence - Extermination of Humanity - 16th Jan 18
Carillion Goes Bust, as Government Refuses to Bailout PFI Contractors Debt and Pensions Liabilities - 15th Jan 18
What Really Happens in Iran?  - 15th Jan 18
Stock Market Near an Intermediate Top? - 15th Jan 18
The Key Economic Indicator You Should Watch in 2018 - 15th Jan 18
London Property Market Crash Looms As Prices Drop To 2 1/2 Year Low - 15th Jan 18
Some Fascinating Stock Market Fibonacci Relationships... - 15th Jan 18
How to Know If This Stock Market Rally Will Continue for Two More Months? - 14th Jan 18
Everything SMIGGLE from Pencil Cases to Water Bottles, Pens and Springs! - 14th Jan 18
Land Rover Discovery Sport Very Bad MPG Fuel Economy! Real Owner's Review - 14th Jan 18
Gold Miners’ Status Updated - 13th Jan 18
Gold And Silver – Review of Annual, Qrtly, Monthly, Weekly Charts. Reality v Sentiment - 13th Jan 18
Gold GLD ETF Update.. Bear Market Reversal Watch - 13th Jan 18
Stock Market Leadership In 2018 To Come From Oil & Gas - 13th Jan 18
Stock Market Primed for a Reversal - 13th Jan 18
Live Trading Webinar: Discover 3 High-Confidence Trade Set-Ups - 13th Jan 18
Optimum Entry Point for Gold and Silver Stocks - 12th Jan 18
Stock Selloffs Great for Gold - 12th Jan 18
These 3 Facts Show Gold Is Set to Surge in 2018 - 12th Jan 18
How China is Locking Up Critical Resources in the US’s Own Backyard - 12th Jan 18
Stock futures are struggling. May reverse Today - 12th Jan 18
Three Surprising Places You See Cryptocurrency - 12th Jan 18
Semi Seconductor Stocks Canary Still Chirping, But He’s Gonna Croak in 2018 - 12th Jan 18
Land Rover Discovery Sport Panoramic Sunroof Questions Answered - 12th Jan 18
Information About Trading With Alpari And Its Advantages - 12th Jan 18

Market Oracle FREE Newsletter

6 Critical Money Making Rules

How Falling Oil Prices Could Trigger an "Unpredictable and Dangerous Mess"

Commodities / Crude Oil Sep 24, 2014 - 01:48 PM GMT

By: Money_Morning

Commodities

Dr. Kent Moors writes: The dive in crude oil prices continued yesterday as yet another selloff targeted the energy sector for a particularly big hit.

Of course, this too shall pass.

The crude oil markets are oversold and a rebalancing will bring prices back up a bit over the near term.


But the prospect of a protracted decline in oil prices is beginning to have broader policy implications in dangerous parts of the world, where rising prices have been the norm for most of the last decade.

I’m talking about what is going on in countries like Libya, where what’s underway now could become the standard for wider regional instability.

As this situation develops, it could quickly get downright nasty…

Three Reasons Why Oil Prices Are Falling

As it stands, West Texas Intermediate (WTI), the New York benchmark crude rate for futures contracts, has fallen 14.2% since its most recent high on June 19. London Brent also hit its most recent high on the same date, and has since fallen 15.8% through yesterday’s peg.

There are three reasons behind this decline.

First, unconventional crude production in the U.S., and unconventional and heavy oil extraction elsewhere in the world, has changed the supply side dynamic. Of course, these expectations will be revised as production rates change. But in the short term at least, the availability of shale oil is putting downward pressure on oil prices.

Second, this is also the time of year – between end of the summer driving season and the beginning of the transition into heating fuel for the winter months – when a decline in oil prices usually occurs. Only this year the decline has been more pronounced than usual.

Finally, and this is the truly unusual element, the presence of significant geopolitical tension is simply being discounted by oil traders. For instance, consider all of the uncertainties in the world today. A civil war and governmental paralysis has effectively taken all of Libya’s exports off the table. Iraq is in utter turmoil. And Ukraine is gearing up for the next phase of its crisis, since it doesn’t have enough energy in storage to meet the advancing winter.

Traditionally, a troika like this (combined with some smaller other events) would be enough to spike oil prices. In fact, that is exactly what happened in mid-June when all three of these crises seemed to collide.

Yet oil prices quickly retreated. Apparently, traders are not of the opinion, at least not yet, that the current geopolitical matrix is having a direct impact on the availability oil. Adequate supply side calculations, combined with some demand abatement, have only bolstered this approach.

Of course, going out further on the curve toward longer-term futures contracts does indicate some renewed concern about prices, and global demand is still climbing, increasing to the highest daily barrel figures we’ve ever seen. It is just not accelerating yet.

However, it could just be the lull before another tempest.

Nonetheless, end users are certainly welcoming the reprieve in prices. While the year-on-year difference in price is still higher, it is also tolerable by comparison. But the truth is these prices, while welcome, hardly classify as bargain basement pricing.

Even still, the longer we remain near the $90 level, the more likely it is that we will see a very standard response. Prices below anticipated levels will generate additional demand pressure.

Put simply, when energy is cheaper than expected, people use more of it.

As it stands, the current price of oil is well within the range analysts consider acceptable for continued economic development in price-taking markets (those dependent on others for their energy flow).

It is on the other side of the ledger where lower oil prices are beginning to cause major problems.

Where Lower Oil Prices are a Recipe for Disaster

In price-making countries, those nations that are in the export business, the current pricing environment is creating a policy nightmare. It’s not that the price of oil is too low. At $90 a barrel, all of these producers continue to make a nice profit.

That’s because domestic production abroad is paid for in local currencies, while the exports are purchased with hard currencies, namely the U.S dollar. That spread between the two allows for very cheap production costs and better proceeds on every sale.

Instead, the problem emerges in another way.

Rentier countries (those where the central budget is determined by foreign oil sales, not the development of land and economic diversification) are prisoners of the price oil commands on the world market. Since virtually everything else in these countries needs to be imported, declining oil prices add significant economic pressures.

By their nature, these rentier economies need to be able to design and administer multi-year spending programs based on projected oil revenues. Given their accelerating population growth, especially among the young for whom the unemployment rate is skyrocketing, and the inability to offset the energy sector with increasing revenue from other sources, planning in these economies becomes more difficult.

For the energy producers in the Middle East and North Africa, this is creating a mammoth crisis. One of the aftermaths from the “Arab Spring” has been an increase in government commitments to larger social and welfare programs, heavy internal subsidies on everything from gasoline to food, and an attempt to buy off rising dissent with governmental largess.

The important point is this: All of these promises require more than just the continued sale of oil.

They also require increased revenues from the sale of oil. In fact, several regional studies have already indicated that most Middle Eastern producers will require an average and sustainable crude price at least 25% higher than what is commanded today through 2020.

Thereafter, unless significant diversification takes place (and there are no tangible indications that will happen), the average price of oil needs to reach $130-$135 a barrel before 2025. And absent pronounced and deepening geopolitical pressures, the alternative supplies globally available would make these prices problematic, although possible.

As a result, here is the quandary facing the producing countries in a restrained oil pricing environment. Planning needs to be done in at least five-year increments. But the funds necessary to pay for those programs are very uncertain.

That has all the earmarks of rising internal political unrest. Each year the population becomes more reliant on central authorities, not the market. And a government can only buy an artificial domestic peace if the money continues to flow.

This is ultimately unsustainable – even if oil prices are rising. But in the current environment, a protracted narrow pricing range could easily translate into a dangerous and unpredictable mess like the one going on in Libya right now.

And Libya is just the beginning of this mess.

Over the past few days, the crisis hitting in Algeria looks like it has become “the new normal;” an inability to plan more than six months out because of uncertainty in oil prices and rising political demands from an increasingly frustrated population.

It’s a nasty mix that will eventually explode.

Source : http://oilandenergyinvestor.com/2014/09/falling-oil-prices-trigger-unpredictable-dangerous-mess/

Money Morning/The Money Map Report

©2014 Monument Street Publishing. All Rights Reserved. Protected by copyright laws of the United States and international treaties. Any reproduction, copying, or redistribution (electronic or otherwise, including on the world wide web), of content from this website, in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited without the express written permission of Monument Street Publishing. 105 West Monument Street, Baltimore MD 21201, Email: customerservice@moneymorning.com

Disclaimer: Nothing published by Money Morning should be considered personalized investment advice. Although our employees may answer your general customer service questions, they are not licensed under securities laws to address your particular investment situation. No communication by our employees to you should be deemed as personalized investent advice. We expressly forbid our writers from having a financial interest in any security recommended to our readers. All of our employees and agents must wait 24 hours after on-line publication, or after the mailing of printed-only publication prior to following an initial recommendation. Any investments recommended by Money Morning should be made only after consulting with your investment advisor and only after reviewing the prospectus or financial statements of the company.

Money Morning Archive

© 2005-2018 http://www.MarketOracle.co.uk - The Market Oracle is a FREE Daily Financial Markets Analysis & Forecasting online publication.


Post Comment

Only logged in users are allowed to post comments. Register/ Log in

6 Critical Money Making Rules